Mountain on asteroid Vesta is three times taller than Mt. Everest

Vesta, while one of the largest asteroids, is still a lot smaller than Earth, and yet it has a mountain that is three times taller than Mt. Everest, reaching about 22 kilometres (13 miles) in height. It sits inside the huge south polar crater, so is similar to many other craters on various planets and moons which have central peaks. It is surprising nonetheless to see such a large mountain on a relatively small body like Vesta, especially since it is so much higher than the tallest mountain on Earth!

Perspective view of south polar mountain on Vesta. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI

The included image, taken by the orbiting Dawn spacecraft, shows a perspective view of the topography, but without the curvature of Vesta, as if you were looking at it standing on a flat Vesta instead of rounded. The resolution is about 300 metres (1,000 feet). The additional slideshow images show various views of the mountain. There is also a large steep-sloped scarp which bounds part of the south polar crater.

Overhead view of south polar mountain on Vesta. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI
Oblique view of south polar mountain on Vesta. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI

There will be a news conference on Wednesday, October 12 at 10:00 a.m. PDT to discuss the latest results from Dawn, to be held at the Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America, in Minneapolis. It can be watched live on the Geological Society of America web site and on Ustream, which includes a moderated chat.

This article was first published on Examiner.com.