Enceladus and its water geysers pose again for Cassini

View of Enceladus' surface, image taken October 19, 2011. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Saturn’s tiny moon Enceladus was the centre of attention for the Cassini spacecraft again last week, with beautiful new photos being released of the moon and its water vapour geysers erupting from the south pole. Some views show surface detail on the moon, some are of the geysers themselves and there is a very nice shot of Enceladus silhouetted against Saturn and its rings in the background. There is even a dual ultraviolet stellar occultation in which two of the stars in the belt of the constellation Orion are seen shining through the plumes! Even though these are still raw, unprocessed images, they again capture the beauty of Enceladus and the Saturnian system…

See Universe Today for the full article.

The rains of Titan

For the first time, the Cassini spacecraft has documented extensive rainstorms in the equatorial regions of Titan. The rains were already known to fill the many lakes near the moon’s north and south poles, but now also appear to occur at lower latitudes, in seasonal cycles reminiscent of those on Earth, except of course, that Titan’s rains are liquid methane instead of water. But the hydrological processes are remarkably similar.

Storm clouds near Titan's equator. Credit: NASA/JPL/SSI

There are also many riverbeds on the surface, and the Huygens probe had previously landed in or near one of them back in 2005 and found the surface soil still damp.

More images and animated video clips here.

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