Image Gallery: Martian ‘spoons’ and ‘needles’

"Spoon" #1 seen by Curiosity on sol 1089. Photo Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
“Spoon” #1 seen by Curiosity on sol 1089. Photo Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Wind-eroded rocks on Mars can take many different forms, sometimes resembling common earthly objects. Some good new examples include these long, thin slivers of rock which look like “spoons” and “needles,” seen by the Curiosity rover recently on sols 1089 and 1087. These fragile formations are easier to form in Mars’ weaker gravity and thinner atmosphere and can last much longer than they would on Earth – a unique form of Martian “artwork.”

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New study helps answer mystery of what happened to Mars’ early atmosphere

Mars used to have a thicker atmosphere and water on its surface, but what happened to that atmosphere has been a mystery. New research may finally help answer that question. Image Credit: M. Kornmesser/ESO
Mars used to have a thicker atmosphere and water on its surface, but what happened to that atmosphere has been a mystery. New research may finally help answer that question. Image Credit: M. Kornmesser/ESO

The question of how Mars changed from a once wet world to the much colder and drier one we see today is one that scientists have been trying to answer for a long time. There is plenty of evidence that Mars use to have lakes and rivers, and perhaps even oceans. But what happened to change that? Now, a new study might bring us one step closer to solving this conundrum.

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Curiosity rover continues journey up Mount Sharp after science observations at ‘Marias Pass’

New low-angle “selfie” of the Curiosity rover taken while it was in Marias Pass, consisting of multiple images stitched together. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
New low-angle “selfie” of the Curiosity rover taken while it was in Marias Pass, consisting of multiple images stitched together. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

After extensive investigations of rock layers in Marias Pass, a shallow valley near the base of Mount Sharp, the Curiosity rover is now heading southwest again, to continue gradually climbing the lower slopes of the mountain. Marias Pass is a region with rocks and ground which contain high levels of silica and hydrogen, more evidence that there used to be a lot more water here than there is now.

Read MoreCuriosity rover continues journey up Mount Sharp after science observations at ‘Marias Pass’

Image Gallery: new views of Mount Sharp foothills

Foothills on Mount Sharp. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/Lars (@LarsTheWanderer)
Foothills on Mount Sharp. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/Lars (@LarsTheWanderer)

There are a couple new views of the foothills on Mount Sharp from the Curiosity rover, and they are beautiful. Many layers, mesas and buttes are visible, reminiscent of the American southwest. Curiosity will keep getting closer in the weeks and months ahead. Image processing by Lars (@LarsTheWanderer).

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Potential landing sites for Mars 2020 Rover narrowed down to eight locations

Map of the eight proposed landing sites for the Mars 2020 Rover. Image Credit: NASA/MOLA Science Team
Map of the eight proposed landing sites for the Mars 2020 Rover. Image Credit: NASA/MOLA Science Team

NASA’s next Mars rover is due to launch in July or August 2020, and the number of potential landing sites has now been narrowed down by scientists to eight locations. Out of an initial list of 21 targets, eight sites have been chosen as candidate landing sites for the Mars 2020 Rover. Due to land on Mars in February 2021, the rover will search for rocks which could hold possible evidence of past life on the planet.

Read MorePotential landing sites for Mars 2020 Rover narrowed down to eight locations